Part Time Jobs – Task BA http://taskba.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 15:11:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.2.2 https://taskba.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Part Time Jobs – Task BA http://taskba.com/ 32 32 Alice Everdeen earns $15,000 a month and lives on the school bus https://taskba.com/alice-everdeen-earns-15000-a-month-and-lives-on-the-school-bus/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 14:42:29 +0000 https://taskba.com/alice-everdeen-earns-15000-a-month-and-lives-on-the-school-bus/ This story is part of CNBC Make It’s Millennial Money Series describing how people around the world make, spend and save their money. When Alice Everdeen began recording voiceovers for airlines, video games, and corporations in 2020, she had to work under a laundry basket lined with a mattress pad to get clear audio. Everdeen’s […]]]>

This story is part of CNBC Make It’s Millennial Money Series describing how people around the world make, spend and save their money.

When Alice Everdeen began recording voiceovers for airlines, video games, and corporations in 2020, she had to work under a laundry basket lined with a mattress pad to get clear audio.

Everdeen’s freelance nature hasn’t changed since then, but her background has. In September, she and boyfriend Jay moved into their teal 30-foot school bus and began living and working off the streets.

Everdeen’s income also differs significantly: Before she started as a voice actress, she made $42,000 a year as a content manager for a supplement company. She now makes up to $15,000 each month as a freelance speaker through her private business and listing her services on platforms like Fiverr.

After expenses, Everdeen earned $92,000 in 2021 and has already earned $150,000 this year, according to documents verified by CNBC Make It.

Alice Everdeen, 31, quit her full-time job to become a spokesperson in 2020. Now she works in her converted school bus and makes up to $15,000 a month.

CNBC does it

“The goal was to make a few hundred dollars a month on gas money,” Everdeen, 31, tells CNBC Make It. “Within four or five months, I think, I was able to quit my full-time job.”

Everdeen says her income makes her agency work in both her professional and personal life. She works three to five hours a day on about 150 projects a month, and living on a bus allows her to travel the country.

But that freedom comes at a high price: Everdeen and Jay bought their school bus at a state auction in January 2020 for $7,324. They spent about $85,000 and nearly three years converting it into their new home, and those renovations are standing in the way of Everdeen building her savings account.

Here’s how Everdeen built a six-figure career and how she affords her life on the road.

A natural talent behind the mic

Everdeen grew up mimicking car ads on the radio, but after earning her bachelor’s degree in journalism and fine arts from Rutgers University in 2013, she didn’t necessarily believe her voice would lead to a lucrative career.

But things came full circle in 2018 when Everdeen landed her first and unplanned voiceover job. She worked for an advertising agency, reading clients a screenplay she had written for a local car dealership in Austin, Texas. They liked her voice so much that they decided not to hire an actor and only use Everdeen’s voice in the commercial.

In the months that followed, Everdeen recorded about 10 positions for the dealership. She left advertising agency for a content manager job at a supplement company, where she made $42,000 a year.

In March 2020, two months after she and Jay bought their school bus, she decided to look for voiceover jobs on Fiverr to earn extra money. She brought in over $1,000 in her first month and quickly realized this could become a viable part-time job.

In less than three months, she brought together her monthly income from her full-time job. In July 2020, she decided to quit and work full-time as a voice actress.

“I mostly do commercial TV and radio spots,” says Everdeen. She also records many voicemails for businesses. “It’s been two and a half years and I’ve done almost 3,000 jobs. So it got very busy very quickly.”

Life in a 30 foot school bus

One night in 2019, Everdeen and Jay talked about their goals over drinks, and both realized they wanted to travel. They decided to buy the school bus and began dismantling its seats and windows to convert it into their 30-foot home.

Everdeen and Jay bought their school bus at a state auction in January 2020. It cost her around $85,000 to convert it into a custom living space.

Alice Everdeen

“We wanted to make a bus because it’s a lot more customizable. RVs usually have a set layout,” says Everdeen. “Besides, they’re not so sure. Buses are designed to keep dozens of children safe, especially if they roll over or crash. They are made of steel.”

It took almost three years to integrate the bus – which has 21 feet of interior space – into their home. Jay’s resume is packed with trading experience, particularly in water irrigation, so he and a friend were primarily responsible for building the new indoor and outdoor space.

On the outside, the bus has a signal-boosting antenna, solar panels, and a custom windshield. Inside, her front seat converts to her bed. It also has a wood burning stove, four burner stove and oven, chest style fridge and freezer, working shower and composting toilet. But the bus’s shining star is the filter, which Jay rigged to turn fresh water into drinking water.

The bus also includes Everdeen’s ISO box, an isolated, insulated cover that contains a microphone in which she makes her voiceover recordings. Everdeen rolls out on a drawer. It blocks out most of the bus noise when she’s standing in the pits or sitting on a stool, so it doesn’t sound like she’s recording in a “tin can”.

Not a typical budget

Everdeen previously had a tumultuous relationship with money. She would immediately spend the money she earned on travel and then save for months while she paid off her credit cards.

But once she started making more money doing voiceovers and using savings to refurbish buses, she knew she had to develop new habits. She hired an accountant to help organize her finances.

For the most part, Everdeen’s new method has worked, although it will take time for this progress to be reflected in her bank account. She’s working to pay off a $34,440 credit card balance, thanks largely to the bus.

In her first month on the road in September 2022, she spent $15,520. However, much of that expense went into transitioning to bus life and dealing with an unexpected bus breakdown. Everdeen and Jay were also in Florida when Hurricane Ian struck, so they spent more money to reinforce the bus’s exterior and stock up on groceries and gas.

Everdeen spent $15,520 in September.

CNBC does it

Here’s where her money went in September 2022:

  • Discretionary Expenses: $6,607 on bus renovations, relocation, Airbnb, HipCamp parking, and pet expenses for her dog, Bentley
  • Credit card payments: $2,914 to pay off debt
  • Unexpected expenses: $2,596 for repairs when the bus broke down preparing for Hurricane Ian
  • Meal: $1,880
  • Insurance: $762 for medicine, pet, bus and car
  • Gas: $581
  • Phone: $105 to Verizon and T-Mobile. She has two service providers who guarantee that she can work anywhere.
  • Subscriptions: $75 for Amazon Prime, Netflix, HBO, Spotify and Xbox

Everdeen is currently funneling her disposable income into her credit card debt, but once she pays it off, she plans to start building her savings account.

She also owes $6,412 in student loans that are currently on hold.

A long way ahead

Despite the temporary challenges, Everdeen and Jay have no intention of giving up their life on the road. Everdeen already owns land in New Orleans — she bought it in 2019 for $19,500 and pays $143 a year in property taxes — but she wants to buy more land and have offices in the US

Right now, the point of bus life is that Everdeen and Jay have no plans other than to travel. While the couple is only two months into their journey, life on the road has already changed Everdeen’s attitude towards money and her life, she says.

Jay, Everdeen and their dog Bentley dock in Lacombe, Louisiana. After two months of travel, Everdeen says they have no plans to take their lives on the road.

CNBC does it

“Before that, I was very busy wanting more and needing more. I was bored, I never felt fulfilled,” she says. “Now that I have everything I need in such a small space, I’m not as stressed as I used to be.

“I don’t have to make so many decisions every day… It’s a different sense of freedom that I didn’t think I would ever feel, and this is the first time in my life that I haven’t just wanted more all the time . “

What is your budget breakdown? Share your story with us for the chance to be featured in a future issue.

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Part-time work at Blackburn Rovers, Stockport loans and the inside story of James Brown https://taskba.com/part-time-work-at-blackburn-rovers-stockport-loans-and-the-inside-story-of-james-brown/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://taskba.com/part-time-work-at-blackburn-rovers-stockport-loans-and-the-inside-story-of-james-brown/ When it came time for James Brown to make a decision about his immediate future, it was relatively easy for the Blackburn Rovers defender. The Irishman was enjoying his first pre-season in English football and was hoping to make a name for himself at Ewood Park. A patient wait finally brought a first taste of […]]]>

When it came time for James Brown to make a decision about his immediate future, it was relatively easy for the Blackburn Rovers defender.

The Irishman was enjoying his first pre-season in English football and was hoping to make a name for himself at Ewood Park. A patient wait finally brought a first taste of Championship action on the final day of the 2021/22 season in Birmingham City.

Brown was given a full debut by Tony Mowbray, and the excitement of a long-awaited opportunity was carried into a new era under Jon Dahl Tomasson. But football waits for no one and a training camp in Scotland saw the 24-year-old leave with an important call.

READ MORE: Blackburn Rovers season ratings: Summer signing is superb but two fans’ favorites need to improve

“Jon walked in and nobody knew where they were standing,” Brown tells Lancs Live. “I played a couple of weeks pre-season and played in the Accrington game, I got a dead calf so I couldn’t go to the Scotland games.

“While we were up there we had an honest chat with Gregg Broughton and they said it was my option. They always wanted a right-back where Nyambe goes, so they said I could go to the game week after week or I could fight for my position.

“With the season I had last season, I wanted to make a name for myself and play football regularly in England. I think I made the right decision going on loan this season, especially after they signed Callum Brittain, from which I thought would play most of the games I personally needed to get out and play games regularly.

“I had a chat with Jon before I left and he thought going on loan was a good decision. I asked what I could improve and work on, he said play, get fit. He told me to work on my end product, that’s good and I’m doing it. Hopefully I can come back next preseason and show that I’ve developed.

Brown was by no means loaned out. The decision was entirely up to him, but when you hear his backstory it’s pretty obvious why he found the decision relatively easy.

12 months ago Brown played part-time for Drogheda United in Ireland. He balanced his active days with working at a gym, which could often result in early starts and long hours. Not that you’d hear him complain.

After six months of waiting in the starting blocks at Ewood Park, first-team football was a priority. Brown jumped at the chance to make a name for himself in English football.

As he described it, there is “a big bad world out there”. Playing football is a privilege he loves in League Two with well-supported Stockport County.

“It was crazy, a real roller coaster ride,” he explains, looking back on the last 12 months. The season ended in November in Ireland, I had to get really fit first. I’ve had some conversations with Mowbray and he didn’t want to change defense for that part of the season.

“That was understandable, I thought I could have had a few chances. I could have made my debut much earlier then I loved it at Birmingham and then we had pre-season and I’m on loan, football is a crazy game.

“I’m very thankful for where I am. This time last year I was working and playing football. I know how it’s in the real world, I’ve been doing early mornings and long shifts. I’ve been working in gyms and it feels that now look like this paradise i enjoy every minute, i love manchester and i enjoy life in the minute.

“I don’t know much else, when I made my debut I was part-time. I got up to work and got on with things. I came here and you see boys complaining about little things and I’m like in my head ‘come on, it’s a wicked world out there’. The main difference is recovery, you can take care of yourself a lot more. I’ll make the best of it.”

Finding the right club was crucial, especially at this stage in Brown’s career. It had to fit, with the right manager who would help develop a player with lots of enthusiasm and a drive to improve.

Stockport was the perfect club. After meeting Dave Chalinor and touring the facilities, Brown immediately felt this was the right place.

The location was also ideal. As is the size of the club and the expectations placed on the hatters. Stockport may have only won the National League last season, but they were also set as bookmakers’ pre-season favorites for the League Two title. Edgley Park is not a site lacking in ambition.

“It was good, I played most of the games,” Brown explained. “It’s been a bumpy start (to the season) but the team have done well in recent weeks. I think Stockport, with the football they’ve played, it was important for me to play that style. If They play better and more confident players, that helps you.

“Number one is game time, you see what the manager needs and what position too. With Stockport, the football they play, they wanted me to come in at right-back and right-back. Other clubs might just want cover and Then the location, I’m in Manchester so it’s not too far. I went to the training ground and they have a great setup. I went and got a good feeling about it.

“When I got there I was told they wanted two consecutive promotions. It’s the same with Blackburn with that kind of pressure and it’s good to put yourself in those positions. It’s a big club with a following, I saw. I wanted to play in big games in front of big crowds. I want to be under pressure because that will always improve you.”

Download the LancsLive app for free iPhone here and Android here.

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John H Ringeisen | News, Sports, Jobs https://taskba.com/john-h-ringeisen-news-sports-jobs/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 07:07:54 +0000 https://taskba.com/john-h-ringeisen-news-sports-jobs/ SHERBURN – A life ministry celebration for John H. Ringeisen, 87, of Sherburn, Minnesota will be held on Saturday, November 19, 2022 at 1:30 p.m. at St. Paul’s United Church of Christ in Welcome with burial in the church cemetery . John was called to his eternal rest on Tuesday morning, […]]]>


SHERBURN – A life ministry celebration for John H. Ringeisen, 87, of Sherburn, Minnesota will be held on Saturday, November 19, 2022 at 1:30 p.m. at St. Paul’s United Church of Christ in Welcome with burial in the church cemetery .

John was called to his eternal rest on Tuesday morning, November 15, 2022 at Mayo Clinic Health Systems in Mankato, Minnesota. The visitation will take place on Friday, November 18, 2022 from 5-7 p.m. at St. Paul’s United Church of Christ for the welcome and one hour before the Saturday service at the church. Condolences can be sent to the family online at www.kramerfuneralhome.com

John Henry Ringeisen was born on April 3, 1935 to Elmer and Pearl (Ammann) Ringeisen in the family home in Sherburn Village Township, Martin County, Minnesota. He received his education at the Sherburn Schools, graduating in 1955. He worked for Ernie Jensen at his seed plant in rural Sherburn until he was hired for Charlie Ritter on his cattle station in Iowa. He then attended the Jackson Vocational School for bodywork. On July 6, 1958, he married Arla Mae Hartwig at St. John’s United Church of Christ in Fairmont, Minn. After their marriage they started their family and John was employed in the body shop trade at Roepke Motors and later Park Motors. John also worked part-time with the Sherburn City Police Department and was referred to as “Johnny Law” from locals. He later worked for the Body Department at Hawkins Chevrolet in Sherburn until 1976, then began employment at Railway Motors/Greenlee Textron in Fairmont until his retirement in 2003. He was a member of St Paul’s United Church of Christ in Welcome. After retirement, he worked for Rosen’s Inc. in Fairmont, supplying agricultural chemicals to retailers in MN and WI. In his spare time, John enjoyed traveling with Arla. He enjoyed spending time with his family at the cabin, fishing and snowmobile water skiing, being a devoted sports fan for his grandchildren and having impromptu adventures with Michael “#3.” He is survived by his two sons, David (Betty) Ringeisen of Sherburn, Minnesota, and Ross (Janice) Ringeisen of Truman, Minnesota; five grandchildren, Krista (Brad) Payne of Osceola, Iowa, Amy (Blake) Crosby of Harrisburg, SD, Katie (Lance) Briard of Osceola, Iowa, Ally Ringeisen of Mitchell, SD, Colby Ringeisen of Spencer, Iowa; two great-grandchildren, Crue Crosby and Charlotte Payne; cousin, Ginny (Dean) Kinzie of Good Thunder, Minnesota; other relatives and friends. John was preceded in death by his parents Elmer and Pearl Ringeisen; his wife Arla Mae Ringeisen on June 9, 2022; brothers, Willard, Neil, Oakley, Glen, Maynard and Merlin Ringeisen, cousin, Pam Rosa; and other relatives.

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United States Work-From-Home Consumer Insights Report 2022: COVID-19 Insights, WFH Trends, Going Back to Offices, Attitudes about Work – ResearchAndMarkets.com https://taskba.com/united-states-work-from-home-consumer-insights-report-2022-covid-19-insights-wfh-trends-going-back-to-offices-attitudes-about-work-researchandmarkets-com/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 19:09:00 +0000 https://taskba.com/united-states-work-from-home-consumer-insights-report-2022-covid-19-insights-wfh-trends-going-back-to-offices-attitudes-about-work-researchandmarkets-com/ DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Added United States Work-From-Home Consumer Insights report ResearchAndMarkets.com Offer. This report provides analysis and data-driven discussions on work-from-home trends, including a look at the concerns and impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on wellbeing, work attitudes, demographic trends, and other consumer insights. Working from home – or remote work – became a big trend at […]]]>

DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Added United States Work-From-Home Consumer Insights report ResearchAndMarkets.com Offer.

This report provides analysis and data-driven discussions on work-from-home trends, including a look at the concerns and impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on wellbeing, work attitudes, demographic trends, and other consumer insights.

Working from home – or remote work – became a big trend at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. While some workers, mainly in the knowledge economy, had already worked remotely, many more switched to remote work in March 2020. In some cases, these workers have stayed at home, while others have since returned to the office full-time or part-time.

Changes in where and how we work are affecting so many parts of the US economy, from obvious sectors like commercial real estate to how commuting is changing where and how workers spend their money. Therefore, examining consumer trends in this area can provide insight into marketing and product development opportunities.

This report provides analysis, data, trends, and custom crosstabs using two survey resources:

  • Data from Freedonia Group’s proprietary national online survey conducted in February 2021, June 2021, August 2021, October-November 2021, November-December 2021, February 2022 and May 2022

  • Data from syndicated national consumer survey results from MRI-Simmons Spring Reports 2012-2022

Main topics covered:

1 Introduction

2. COVID-19 Insights

  • Most still view the pandemic as a personal or family/friend health threat

  • Feelings of threat to health by place of work

  • Feelings of threat to health by age group

  • Concerns about COVID-19 variants

  • Concerns about variants of COVID-19 are significant

  • Concerns about variations by work location

  • Concerns about variations by age group

  • Negative personal impact of the pandemic

  • Adverse impacts reported in 2020 and 2021

  • Lasting effects on mental and physical health

  • Changes in mental and physical health effects

  • stress, fatigue and anxiety

  • Energy Level & Focus

3. Work-from-home trends

  • More than half of employees are set up to work from home

  • Differences between full-time and part-time employees

  • Differences by original workplace location

  • Changes in working from home

  • remote work over time

4. Back to the offices

  • advantages in the office

  • Temptations to return to work

  • Attitudes to workplace hygiene

5. Attitudes to work

  • Attitudes to work over time

  • attitudes by generations

  • Settings by primary work location

6. Appendix

For more information about this report, visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/pik6s9

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CCU Greek Life students make blankets and donate them to a non-profit organization https://taskba.com/ccu-greek-life-students-make-blankets-and-donate-them-to-a-non-profit-organization/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 01:51:00 +0000 https://taskba.com/ccu-greek-life-students-make-blankets-and-donate-them-to-a-non-profit-organization/ CONWAY, SC (WMBF) – Student organizations on college campuses often find ways to improve the community, for CCU students it helps to keep others warm during the holiday season. Many students like CCU Junior, Jada Forbes, spend their time between classes and a part-time job making blankets on campus. “I think the most rewarding part […]]]>

CONWAY, SC (WMBF) – Student organizations on college campuses often find ways to improve the community, for CCU students it helps to keep others warm during the holiday season.

Many students like CCU Junior, Jada Forbes, spend their time between classes and a part-time job making blankets on campus.

“I think the most rewarding part is that we can just give all of these blankets to people who really need them,” Forbes said. “Yes, I enjoy it, but I think I know, as my boss Amanda and Lindsey.” said when they went to drop off the blankets they were so happy to see us.”

CCU Fraternity and Sorority Life makes handmade blankets that are donated to the nonprofit Meals on Wheels of Horry County.

The blankets will be distributed to the seniors of Grand Strand for Thanksgiving.

So far, CCU Fraternity and Sorority Life Director Amanda Eisele said they have made and donated nearly 300 blankets to the organization.

“Seeing all the students come in and learn how to make the blankets, produce them, and take real pride in their work,” said Eisele.

She said this is the first time she and the organization have participated in a Meals on Wheels project.

Eisele said she was surprised to see how many students, not even in Greek Life, come to make blankets.

She said her goal is to make around 400 blankets to be donated to those in need by Thanksgiving.

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Programs aim to help people with disabilities find work | Western Colorado https://taskba.com/programs-aim-to-help-people-with-disabilities-find-work-western-colorado/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 11:09:56 +0000 https://taskba.com/programs-aim-to-help-people-with-disabilities-find-work-western-colorado/ country United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsMinor Outlying Islands of the United StatesCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth of theCuba, RepublicDominican RepublicHaiti, RepublicJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist RepublicAlgeria, People’s Democratic RepublicAmerican SamoaAndorra, PrincipalityAngola, RepublicanguillaAntarctica (the area south of 60° S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, RepublicAzerbaijan, RepublicBahrain, KingdomBangladesh, People’s RepublicBarbadosBelarusBelgium, Kingdom ofBelizeBenin, People’s RepublicBermudasBhutan, KingdomBolivia, RepublicBosnia and […]]]>

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Changing Times Creates a Minefield in Employment Law: Summary of Recent and Upcoming Changes in Employment Law | Fairfield and WoodsPC https://taskba.com/changing-times-creates-a-minefield-in-employment-law-summary-of-recent-and-upcoming-changes-in-employment-law-fairfield-and-woodspc/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 22:37:55 +0000 https://taskba.com/changing-times-creates-a-minefield-in-employment-law-summary-of-recent-and-upcoming-changes-in-employment-law-fairfield-and-woodspc/ The world has changed in the last few years, and Colorado is no different. A plethora of new labor laws have been enacted in Colorado that broaden the protections and rights of workers generally. Businesses need to stay abreast of these changes, as many of the new laws have significant penalties for employers who fail […]]]>

The world has changed in the last few years, and Colorado is no different. A plethora of new labor laws have been enacted in Colorado that broaden the protections and rights of workers generally. Businesses need to stay abreast of these changes, as many of the new laws have significant penalties for employers who fail to comply.

This customer mailing is intended to remind customers of some of these changes and to provide an update on some changes planned over the next year. Below is a summary; The laws described are much more complex in practice and do not cover all the changes of recent years. Fairfield and Woods is ready to answer your questions about these changes and to help ensure your operations are up to date.

Laws recently amended or enacted in Colorado (last two years)

  • Colorado’s Healthy Families and Workplaces Act (HFWA): From January 1, 2022, EVERYONE Private employers in Colorado, regardless of size, are subject to the HFWA. This law requires employers to grant one hour of vacation for every 30 hours worked by an employee. HFWA vacation is limited to 48 hours, with unused vacation being carried over to the next year. The HFWA applies to all employees, including temporary workers and part-time employees. Accrued HFWA leave may be taken for a variety of health reasons and domestic violence related leave (“Safe Leave”). Additionally, employers are required to provide Public Health Emergency (PHE) leave for a total of up to 80 hours per PHE (think pandemic-like situations), including the 48 hours required even in the absence of a public health emergency to work for specific PHE to be used related purposes. In addition, the HFWA restricts what documentation an employer can request in relation to the various leave requests. For violations of the HFWA, employers face back wage payments, penalties, legal fees and, in serious cases, fines. There is an exception for employers who have a PTO or similar policy that covers all or more than the requirements of the HFWA. HFWA leave is considered a form of “wage” and should be treated as such without further guidance upon separation.
  • Colorado’s Protected Health/Safety Voice and Whistleblowing Act (PHEW): Passed in July 2020 and recently amended, this law protects “workers” (including independent contractors) from retaliation and interference for: (1) raising concerns about, or the threat of, potential workplace health and safety violations; (2) to object to labor practices that the worker believes to be unlawful under PHEW; or (3) participate, including filing a claim, in any investigation relating to any matter that the employee believes is unlawful under PHEW. While the law was originally linked to issues related to the COVID pandemic, it has expanded to include any health and safety concerns. PHEW also allows workers, under certain conditions, to use their own personal protective equipment (PPE) non-reactively. PHEW requires workers to file a complaint with the state before filing a lawsuit.
  • “Ban the Box” A/K/A Colorado’s chance to enter the competition: Ban the Box applies to all private employers and prohibits them from (1) advertising that prospective applicants with a criminal record do not need (including such a statement in the application); (2) to ask an applicant about his/her criminal record at the time of the initial application; and (3) require an applicant to disclose their criminal history on an initial application. Employers can inquire about criminal records after the initial application process. The law does not prohibit background checks. There are limited exceptions provided by the law.
  • Colorado’s Equal Pay for Equal Work Act (EPEW): EPEW applies to all employers who employ at least one person in Colorado. The law requires employers to provide a description of compensation and benefits in their job postings for positions that are located at a Colorado work location or for work that can be performed in Colorado (including remote work). Employers can book compensation within a reasonable framework within certain parameters. Employers must also make reasonable efforts to disclose all promotion opportunities with current employers before making a promotion decision. These promotions are considered job postings and must include the required description of compensation and benefits. Note that employers are not required to post vacancies or have job postings, but if they choose to do so, they must comply with the law. Notice of termination is not required for temporary or temporary positions of six months or less. While the law does not give employees a private right to sue, employees can lodge complaints with the state, which in turn can impose fines and penalties on employers.
  • Individual liability for violations of the HFWA and the Colorado Wage Act: From January 1, 2020, individuals who are considered “employers” may be held personally liable for violations of the HFWA and the Colorado Wage Act (CWA) in addition to their business activities. Violations of these laws result in serious liability, including payment of arrears of wages, overtime, penalties, and payment of employee attorneys’ fees. This aligns Colorado law with federal law, which has allowed such liability for years using a complex multi-factor test. While the test requires fact-specific analysis, essentially senior and executive individuals with direct control over an employee’s work parameters should be concerned about personal liability.
  • Payment of earned vacation time: In June 2021, the Colorado Supreme Court affirmed that accrued vacation time constitutes “wages” for purposes of the CWA and, as such, unused vacation time must be paid when a separation from employment occurs. The term “vacation” is broad and includes most types of employer-provided PTO. Any agreement or policy that lapses by this time is unenforceable and the method of separation does not matter. Note that employers are not required to provide leave or PTO time (although they must provide HFWA leave). Employers can limit this time to a certain number, set savings rates, and limit how much and when this time can be used. Employers cannot limit how much accumulated time can be carried over to a subsequent year, but they can set a cap on the maximum creditable time.
  • Restrict covenant agreements (non-compete / non-solicitation): Colorado recently changed the law on restrictive agreements (think non-compete agreements (NCAs) and non-client agreements (NSAs)), making them significantly more difficult to enforce. This law applies ONLY to restrictive agreements entered into on or after August 10, 2022. Essentially, NCAs and NSAs are severely penalized and are now very difficult to enforce. NCAs are enforceable with respect to “highly compensated” individuals under the current Colorado PAY CALC Order (currently individuals earning $101,250 or more) to protect trade secrets, AND as long as they are reasonable. Customer NSAs have similar requirements, but the income threshold is 60% of the highly compensated amount. Note that this law applies to both employees and independent contractors. Certain exceptions still exist for special circumstances. The law provides certain notification requirements for both new and current “employees” and also limits jurisdiction and choice of law for restrictive agreements with Colorado for Colorado employees. Given the severe penalties now associated with the law, including potential criminal sanctions, as well as the possibility of individual liability, it is recommended that strict adherence to the new law be observed.

New laws in Colorado are scheduled to go into effect in the future

  • Colorado’s Paid Family Health Insurance Program (FAMLI): FAMLI requires EVERYONE Colorado private employers (and out-of-state private employers with 10 or more Colorado employees) to offer Colorado employees paid family and medical leave of twelve (12) to sixteen (16) weeks effective January 1, 2024. FAMLI leave payments are paid either through private health insurance or through the government program. The program will be funded from employee and/or employer contributions from January 1, 2023 (depending on the size of the company). insured private plan that is as good as or better than required by law. Both private plans must be approved in advance by the state. FAMLI covers most major life events including but not limited to major health issues, caring for family members who have major health issues and caring for a new child (birth and adoption). Please note that no private plans have been approved and guidance on this subject is not expected until sometime in the first quarter of 2023. Workers and insured employers will begin paying premiums beginning January 1, 2023, with an opportunity to receive a refund if they receive approval for an approved private plan submitted to the state before October 31, 2023 became.
  • Penalties for Wage Theft and Misclassification (SB 22-161): Beginning January 1, 2023, an employer’s failure to pay wages due and owed within 14 days of written notice will be subject not only to payment of the amount due, but also to a penalty of double the amount owed or $1,000, depending on: which amount is higher. If the non-payment is found to be intentional, the penalty increases to three times the amount owed or $3000, whichever is greater. Additional penalties are possible in certain circumstances, and the law changes allow for class action claims.

Proposed upcoming changes

  • Change in U.S. Department of Labor regulations for independent contractors: The DOL recently issued a proposed rule that “clarifies” its position on the classification of independent contractors. Specifically, the proposed rule would overturn a 2021 ruling that made it easier for companies to classify an individual as an independent contractor. The new rule would replace the current two-core factor test with a more rigorous “all of the circumstances” analysis. Independent contractor misclassification carries serious liability at both the state and wage levels, including possible past overtime pay, employee compensation, missed benefits, double and treble penalties, and payment of employee attorney fees. When they go into effect, companies that work with many independent contractors, especially sole proprietors, should review those individuals and reclassify them as necessary.
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What is a recession? https://taskba.com/what-is-a-recession/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 11:29:07 +0000 https://taskba.com/what-is-a-recession/ The central theses A recession is a period of sustained decline in economic activity. The old rule of thumb used to be two straight quarters of negative economic growth, but now it’s up to the National Bureau of Economic Research to declare the onset of a recession. Recessions can have many different causes and can […]]]>

The central theses

  • A recession is a period of sustained decline in economic activity.
  • The old rule of thumb used to be two straight quarters of negative economic growth, but now it’s up to the National Bureau of Economic Research to declare the onset of a recession.
  • Recessions can have many different causes and can be a challenging time for investors.
  • There are some unique investment opportunities for investors during recessions, such as B. Investments in precious metals or large caps.

It’s a timely question. What is a recession? We’re hearing the word absolutely everywhere right now. We all know it’s bad news, we all know we don’t want it, but what does that actually mean?

Economists and financial analysts have a habit of using a lot of terminology without properly explaining what the term really means. Most readers are tuned in enough to get the gist, but it can be useful to get the definition of these economic terms right.

Not only that, it is also very useful for investors. Recessions are inevitable. There have been many of these in the past and there will be many more in the future. It can often be a scary time to invest, but if you have a long enough time horizon, it can also be one of the best times to invest.

To do this, you need to understand how to navigate the investment markets when the seas are choppy. We can help you with this, and AI can too.

Download Q.ai today for access to AI-supported investment strategies. If you deposit $100, we’ll add another $100 to your account.

How is economic growth measured?

A recession is a metric heavily based on an economy’s level of growth. To properly explain what a recession is, we must first step back and look at how economic growth is measured.

In good times, consumers spend, people get raises, and life is generally good for many households. When this happens, the economy grows.

The most common measure of economic growth is what is known as gross domestic product or GDP. This metric adds up the total economic value created across all industries and jobs across the country. Whether you’re an accountant, a builder, a lawyer, or a janitor, all that work and value adds up to provide a guide to the country’s overall performance.

Because of this, when demand for goods and services increases, more is produced and the economy grows through higher GDP.

Let’s take a very simple example of a supermarket. In good times, the main breadwinner in a household may get a raise and the second adult in the household manages to get a part-time job. That means they have plenty of money each month so they can afford to buy nicer groceries.

They might do some shopping at Whole Foods, pick up the odd steak or two, and opt for branded granola and condiments. This means that the supermarket gets paid more by this household, which increases GDP.

On the other hand, during a recession in the same household, the primary wage earner’s salary could stagnate and the secondary wage earner could be laid off. With less money each month, they could stop going to whole foods and start eating cheaper meals. Now this supermarket is receiving less money from the budget, meaning it won’t add as much value to GDP.

This is the same in all sectors of the economy. In times of economic prosperity, we buy more clothes, more sneakers, more vacations, more iPhones, and more makeup. When times are bad, we buy fewer or choose cheaper options.

What is a recession?

In very simple terms, a recession is a period of sustained negative economic activity when the economy is contracting and households have less cash to spend. Traditionally, a recession was when the economy had two consecutive quarters (six months total) of negative economic growth. Nowadays the definition is a bit more complex.

While the old definition is still used as a good rule of thumb around the world, in the United States it is now up to the bipartisan government agency, the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), to announce when a recession has officially happened.

They look at a wide range of different data to make the decision that goes beyond simply measuring GDP. In many ways that makes sense. For example, under the old definition, it just wasn’t possible for a recession to last less than six months. The world is moving incredibly fast these days and we have seen how quickly the economy can change at the onset of the Covid pandemic.

This was the shortest recession ever, lasting just two months. According to the old definition, it would not have been a recession at all.

The flexibility also takes into account the complexity of the economy. We are witnessing a great example of this. Economic growth was negative for two consecutive quarters in early 2022, and yet we have yet to enter an official recession.

That’s because there was other economic data that wasn’t quite as negative. During these periods of negative growth, the unemployment rate remained very low and consumer spending was high. Wages actually rose, but still fell in real terms due to high inflation.

What Causes Recessions?

Recessions can be caused by a variety of factors. As mentioned above, the recent recession was caused by a global pandemic. This was new to all of us. A major shock to economies around the world is unusual, but other examples would be World War I and World War II.

Wealth bubbles and excessive debt are two other causes that often go hand in hand. The global recession of 2008 was caused by a combination of a global housing bubble backed by unsustainable levels of debt. When the bubble burst, many companies laid off thousands of workers and scaled back or shut down operations.

This led to a huge drop in economic activity and it was not surprising that a recession ensued.

Another relatively recent recession that stemmed in part from an asset bubble was the dot-com bubble of 2001. In the early days of the internet, huge amounts of money poured into brand new startups, many with very little business plans or prospects.

A domain name and a story were often enough to attract millions of dollars in venture capital investment, and the house of cards eventually collapsed. Added to this was the shock of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, which continued to panic the markets and spread fear in the economy.

There have been many other recessions throughout history that started for a variety of reasons. Some have been linked to interest rates, oil prices and high inflation.

How can investors navigate a recession?

Individuals face a number of challenges during recessions. The first is concern for their employment situation. When the economy shrinks, certain sectors are particularly vulnerable to layoffs and hiring freezes.

Other industries are more resilient to market factors, with many sectors experiencing less change in demand regardless of how well or poorly the economy is doing.

The other challenge is investing. Whether it’s extra money saved for a rainy day or a $401,000 value or an IRA, it can be difficult to watch your portfolio’s volatility increase when the news cycle turns negative and There are concerns about the health of the economy.

The good news is that there are many ways to invest during a recession that can limit the pain and even create opportunities for additional growth.

One of the most common ways to do this is by investing in assets traditionally considered “safe havens”. The best examples of this are gold and other precious metals, especially silver, platinum and palladium.

The history of precious metals as an investment goes back literally thousands of years, and even in our modern financial system, the price of gold, silver and others often rises due to bad economic news.

If you don’t know where to start investing in these types of assets, we have an investment kit that will do all the work for you. Our Precious Metals Kit uses AI and machine learning to predict how metals are likely to perform over the coming week and then automatically rebalance between them.

It is the perfect combination of centuries-old investment values ​​and the latest investment technology.

Another way to approach investing during a recession is to focus on large-cap stocks. When economic growth is stagnant or negative, large companies tend to outperform small and medium-sized companies. That doesn’t necessarily mean they will skyrocket and yield big returns, but they can often fall less or stay flat.

This is because they tend to have more diversified revenue streams, more stable costs, and don’t rely as much on new customers to meet their goals.

In and of itself, this isn’t the most exciting investment opportunity in the world. Losing less money is one thing, but ideally, as an investor, you want to grow your money.

To take advantage of this, we developed the Large Cap Kit. As the name suggests, it invests in large companies, but again, that’s not necessarily a winning strategy when the overall market is down. For this reason we are simultaneously long large caps and short small and mid caps.

Investors thus benefit from the relative change between large companies and small to medium-sized companies. This means that this kit can still generate a return even when the market goes sideways or down, as long as large companies hold up better than smaller ones.

All hope isn’t lost for investors in a recession, it just takes a little more work to find the trades that can work in turbulent times.

Download Q.ai today for access to AI-supported investment strategies. If you deposit $100, we’ll add another $100 to your account.

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COLUMN: Still the Simple Things | columns https://taskba.com/column-still-the-simple-things-columns/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 10:45:00 +0000 https://taskba.com/column-still-the-simple-things-columns/ “Memory is the diary we all carry around with us.” ~ Irish poet and playwright Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde As we age – and we all do, no matter what age we are – we gain experience, talents, friends, likes and dislikes, and a multitude of memories. Some memories are nice to us, some […]]]>

“Memory is the diary we all carry around with us.” ~ Irish poet and playwright Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde

As we age – and we all do, no matter what age we are – we gain experience, talents, friends, likes and dislikes, and a multitude of memories.

Some memories are nice to us, some are not so good, and we all make mistakes. You may deny it to others, but you really cannot deny this fact.

For me, as I get older, it’s the simple things that stick with me more than anyone else.

And I find that comforting.

You’d think it’s the big things in life that we remember the most, but I’m not so sure.

Little memories, at least for me and I bet many of you reading this give us little joys from the simple things in our lives that will last forever.

I have no idea why this little reminder has kept popping into my head for the past week.

The reminder is on milk breaks at school.

Well, I’m not sure what your experience with school milk breaks was, but mine really love it.

As I recall from my elementary school days at Waukomis, those 2¢- and 3¢-a-carton milk breaks in the afternoon — with students taking turns as milk monitors, picking up a tub filled with ice and ice-cold milk — seemed like just the thing for one Time to come when I really needed that chocolate pick-me-up for my brain.

And for some reason that milk was always ice cold and I still carry that memory with me to this day when I just have to drink everything ice cold or it just doesn’t fit – or that fulfills memory.

All I can think of as I write this is that I’m in dire need of a tall glass of cold chocolate milk.

Another simple reminder is to wait for the bell to ring just before the end of the last lesson of the day.

Didn’t it seem like those last five minutes before the last chime lasted an hour or two?

That the second hand of that great Seth Thomas watch would never get there.

Maybe it’s just me, but I couldn’t wait to be on my way home or to the family print shop on Main Street.

Perhaps one of my simplest memories was hiking to my grandparents’ house for Thanksgiving or Christmas.

Or the reunion of relatives and cousins ​​and great aunts and uncles. It’s still a memory that lingers.

Or maybe it’s the simplest of memories, when you feel that immense relief you felt after you introduced the guest speaker at your high school graduation and it was all over.

That burden suddenly lifted from your young shoulders after you had to stand there before that crowd rushed into the school gym – and you hadn’t embarrassed yourself and died of stage fright in front of the whole town.

Maybe it was that simple memory of seeing classmates for the very last time after graduation. You had spent 12 years day by day with most of these classmates until they were like your own brothers and sisters. And suddenly you got kicked out of school and you’re on your own in the world.

Well, cast out isn’t quite right. You graduated and you just didn’t know what to do with your life at the time, and you were no longer surrounded by others like you – they’re gone.

One simple thing for me, at least in the days after high school, was the sobering thought that I would have to make life-changing decisions about what I wanted to do after the ripe old age of 18.

Was it to join the military like your father and grandpa, uncles and cousins ​​did during the world wars?

Was it to go to college and study law, or maybe to become a history teacher?

Actually, at that time in my life I had never thought of becoming a journalist.

There was the Vietnam War to consider, there were student loans and how to pay for college, there were part-time jobs and finding a way to pay for a car and transportation—suddenly there were obstacles in life to consider that went well beyond the math test at the end of the semester .

Looking back those were simple things, I just thought they were above my pay grade.

As the Oscar Wilde quote that opens this column says, memory is the diary of each of our lives – he of the three middle names.

Mine is full of simple things that still make me smile — and I only have a middle name.

So what’s in your diary?

Christy is the news editor at Enid News & Eagle. Visit his column blog at www.tinyurl.com/Column-Blog.

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9 ways to invest for your grandkids https://taskba.com/9-ways-to-invest-for-your-grandkids/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 19:00:13 +0000 https://taskba.com/9-ways-to-invest-for-your-grandkids/ Geber86/Getty Images Grandparents often want to contribute to their grandchildren’s future in the form of money for college savings, e.g. B. by contributing to a 529 plan (an educational investment account that also allows for tax-free payouts for college-related expenses). The future of finance: Gen Z and their relationship with money Discover: Answers to your […]]]>

Geber86/Getty Images

Grandparents often want to contribute to their grandchildren’s future in the form of money for college savings, e.g. B. by contributing to a 529 plan (an educational investment account that also allows for tax-free payouts for college-related expenses).

The future of finance: Gen Z and their relationship with money
Discover: Answers to your biggest money etiquette questions

However, not every child chooses to go to college and there are other ways to help them save, such as: B. Buying a home or even retirement.

Here are nine ways to invest for your grandkids they’ll appreciate.

Take out a certificate of deposit

According to Bill Ryze, a Tennessee-based Chartered Financial Consultant (ChFC) and board advisor at Fiona, a certificate of deposit is a great investment because it’s low risk. “It’s appropriate for grandkids because the portfolio can be more conservative as your grandkid grows up and needs the money.”

Since a grandson probably won’t need that money for the next 20 years, a CD has time to earn and you don’t suffer from stock market volatility.

Advice: 5 things to do when your savings hit $50,000

Check out Exchange Traded Funds

Other good options, Ryze said, are exchange-traded funds, or ETFs, which can take the form of bonds or stocks.

“While they sound boring and cliche, ETFs are tax-efficient, inexpensive, and suitable for long-term investing,” Ryze said. “With ETFs, you can ensure that your grandchildren’s future investments are diversified. I suggest custodian accounts among ETFs for tax relief. They also cost [less] and will be instrumental in explaining investment policy to your grandchildren.”

Open a high-yield savings account

If you’re risk-averse and the thought of investing scares you, Ryze says you can always choose a high-yield savings account with a competitive interest rate.

“While it’s an easy choice,” he said, “it’s not always the best choice due to inflationary effects that could reduce purchasing power over time.” You can mitigate this risk by choosing a savings account with a highly competitive interest rate to beat the impact of inflation.”

Invest in real estate

One area that grandparents may not have thought of is buying real estate for grandchildren. If you can afford to buy a house with a 15 or 20-year mortgage, that house will be free and free for your grandchild when they’re a young adult — and it can then be rented out or sold, Emanuel Stafilidis said , CEO of Capable Home Buyers.

He proposed creating a family trust that would allow each property purchased to be in its own land trust within the family trust.

“Sounds difficult, but nothing a legal entity can’t set up for anyone,” Stafilidis said. “This structure protects each trait from all other traits in case something goes wrong with one trait.”

Contribute to a Roth IRA

If your grandchildren are already working and thus have an income, you can make contributions to a Roth IRA on their behalf, said Jordan Patrick, CFP and financial advisor at Commas. Then you’re really helping them prepare for their futures for a time when they might even have grandchildren of their own.

“The contribution limit for 2022 is $6,000 and will increase to $6,500 in 2023,” Patrick said. “A Roth IRA allows for tax-free distributions after age 59. For example, if contributions were made to a Roth IRA for a 15-year-old, the funds could be invested and experience the benefits of compound interest for nearly five decades. This would help leave your grandchildren with substantial tax-free wealth when they retire.”

Open a Coverdell Education Savings Account

While 529 plans are to be used for college, Coverdale Education Savings Accounts (ESAs) allow the money to be used towards K-12 students’ education expenses, according to Jason Porter, senior investment manager at Scottish Heritage SG.

“It’s an investment account that makes paying for your grandchildren’s college expenses easier,” Porter said. “You must make Coverdell payments before your grandchildren turn 18 to be eligible for a tax deduction.”

Invest in mutual funds

Mutual funds may not be as glamorous as other types of investments, said Adam Wood, co-founder of RevenueGeeks, but they can offer inexpensive portfolio variety.

“Funds can hold any combination of stocks and bonds depending on the index the fund follows or the manager’s investment decisions,” Wood said. “Mutual funds are typically available in 529 plans, and you can invest in them through a Roth IRA, a custody broker, or Coverdell ESA. I recommend examining a fund’s expense ratio to see how expensive it is compared to other funds in the same category – e.g. B. US large-cap companies.”

However, he warns against “being suspicious of putting an end-of-date fund in a custody account. In 2021, Vanguard shareholders were surprised by hefty capital gains distributions and an unexpected tax bill.”

buy shares

After all, stocks have a long track record and outperform over the long term, according to Tammy Trenta, CFP, founder and CEO of Family Financial.

“History tells us that stocks will return an average of 10% over time,” Trenta said. “If grandchildren are young and have a time horizon of 10 years or more, there are a few ways to help them invest in stocks. First set up a securities account. Depending on the state, it may also be called UGMA or UTMA.”

Grandparents can give them cash so they can buy stocks and/or give them stocks that trade at the same value they were bought for.

Build financial literacy

Sometimes a financial investment can go beyond just investing; it can teach them about finance.

“By far the best investment you can make in your child or grandchild is to provide them with financial literacy and established credit when they are young,” said Garett Polanco, an accredited investor.

He recommends the following ways to do this, which will result in kids building good credit, staying out of debt, and earning an income:

  • Add the child as an authorized user with little or no access to two credit cards. These cards must be at 20% capacity.

  • Open a bank account in the child’s name.

  • Set up a GmbH or a company and hire the child part-time for the company. Make sure the kid does the work and pays taxes.

  • Get the kid another part-time job.

More from GOBankingRates

This article originally appeared on GOBankingRates.com: 9 Ways To Invest for Your Grandchildren

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